‘Last Night in Soho’: The Interesting Genre-Bending Film from Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright’s Last Night in Soho works well to craft a film that just hits its mark as it juggles a lot to present a cohesive film.

CREDIT: Focus Features

3.5/5

Edgar Wright is back on the silver screen after his Academy Award-nominated film, Baby Driver. Yes, it has been four years since the last time we saw something new from the English director known for films such as Hot Fuzz, Shaun of the Dead, and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World. Last Night in Soho like a lot of films released this year was supposed to be released last year but after two delays it finally graced the silver screen. Does this rank up there with the rest of his films? How does the latest Edgar Wright movie stack up against his filmography?

Last Night in Soho is directed by Edgar Wright from a script by Wright and Krysty Wilson-Cairns based on a story by Wright himself. The film stars Thomasin McKenzie, Anya Taylor-Joy, Matt Smith, Michael Ajao, Terence Stamp, and Diana Rigg. The film follows Ellie played by McKenzie, as a young adult who lost her mother at a young age going off to fashion school to become a designer in London. Ellie is in love with the music and overall design of the ’60s. She does not really seem to fit in at her dormitory with the other housemates so she seeks out a new living arrangement. Ellie finds herself at a new flat in London that takes her on a journey of visions of 60’s London and an aspiring singer, Sandie. Thus, after an exploration of these visions things start to spiral out of control.

Last Night in Soho works most of the time when it is not juggling a convoluted third act and uneven pacing. The film is shot by Chung Chung-hoon who is well known for collaborating with South Korean auteur, Park Chan-wook. The cinematography works for the film and what it is doing but having someone like Chung-hoon as DP you’d think that it would have more style to it. The performances are fine but of course, Thomasin McKenzie and Anya Taylor-Joy give some well nuanced and interesting performances. The story is interesting and Wright trying to bend genres like horror, Giallo, and a drama together makes for an interesting film but it falls under the weight of a lackluster second half. The film explores important themes about the personal agency of victims that deserve their own separate conversation. I commend Wright on basing this part of the film on many victims’ stories that he talked to. If it did not have many problems like its script then this would be another hit from Edgar Wright, but I still recommend people go watch this. It is still very much an Edgar Wright film and fans of that will be satisfied.

Watch Last Night in Soho in theatres and will be available soon on PVOD.

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